Translating communities

There's been a lot of interesting discussion recently in the Classics Twitter-sphere about translation - and specifically about sexism in translation. Emily Wilson's translation of the Odyssey has been the catalyst for a lot of this discussion, and she has been outspoken about the deficiencies that she sees in previous translations, including sexism and the... Continue Reading →

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Reblogged: Writing for the stars

Here's a lovely post by CREWS Project colleague Philip Boyes on some of the fictional writing systems used in Star Wars. The examples of handwriting are particularly fun ways in which the filmmakers have used writing in very human ways. Philip also has interesting things to say on how useful or 'realistic' these strategies actually... Continue Reading →

Snow days

Campus has been closed by heavy snow for two days this week. (I have plenty of food and heating and water - so I'm fine so far.) Too snowy and icy to climb up the hill, but not too snowy for some photos early this morning! These were taken around 7.30 when, as you can... Continue Reading →

New module: Italy Before Rome

I've held off posting about my new module, Italy Before Rome, for two reasons. Most importantly, I've been extremely busy writing and teaching it! But I've also held back because, although I had a vision for what I wanted the module to be like, and the ideas I wanted to get across, I didn't know... Continue Reading →

Codebreakers and groundbreakers

From 24th October to 4th February, the Fitzwilliam Museum and the Museum of Classical Archaeology are putting on a joint exhibition called Codebreakers and groundbreakers. The exhibition was inspired by the links between linguistics and codebreaking, and the links between Classical linguistics and Bletchley Park. As the Fitz puts it: A pioneering and interdisciplinary exhibition, Codebreakers and... Continue Reading →

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