wilkins of fish

Ancient languages and John Wilkins’s Real Character

I mentioned that at Geoff Fest last week I gave a paper on the “reception” of Oscan – mainly consisting of mentions of Oscan in slightly unexpected contexts from the sixteenth century onwards. One of those instances was in An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language, written by John Wilkins in 1668. Wilkins was a…

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Geoff Fest

This weekend we celebrated the retirement of our Professor of Comparative Philology, Geoff Horrocks. I’ve worked with Geoff for a number of years, during which he’s been my second PhD supervisor and a co-investigator on the Greek in Italy project. As the speeches at last night’s dinner attested, everyone has their favourite memories of Geoff’s…

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Exchange in the Mediterranean

The new book Échanger en Méditerranée: Acteurs, pratiques et normes dans les mondes anciens turned up in my pigeon hole this week – and I’m thrilled to see it in physical form at last! I was also sent some beautifully produced physical off-prints of my chapter – I haven’t seen one of them in ages, and they look…

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Happy first birthday, blog! What I’ve learned so far

Amazingly, it is now a year since I started this blog in its current form. I had a website previously, which was mainly just for sharing teaching materials, but on 2nd June 2015 I revamped this site and wrote my first research-driven blog posts. This year has been busy in general, and has flown by…

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It’s all Greek to Anna

It’s All Greek to Me is a brand new blog by my colleague Anna Judson. Anna is an expert on Linear B, linguistics and Greek in general, so I know that lots of readers will be interested in her site. Anna has long been a major contributor to the Res Gerendae graduate student Classics blog, but…

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Sicily: Culture, Conquest and Battering Rams

Last week I enjoyed a nice afternoon off, checking out the British Museum’s “Sicily: Culture and Conquest”. I highly recommend it – the displays are fascinating, though somewhat crowded (as always). The exhibition focusses mainly on the Greek and Norman periods of Sicilian history, so go with that in mind if you’re expecting lots of…