Dedication to Mefitis

    μεfιτει μαρασ σταλλιεσ βρα τεισ δατ[α]σ To Mefitis, Maras Stallies, for grace given Oscan inscription in the Greek alphabet. Rossano di Vaglio, 325-275 BC. Imagines Italicae: Potentia 13; Sabellische Texte Lu 16. This is an inscription on stone, found at the sanctuary site of Rossano di Vaglio (pictured below) in central Lucania, modern day…

Songs about Pompeii

Most of you are probably familiar with the song “Pompeii”, released by Bastille in 2013. A few weeks ago, Rachele De Felice sent me this link, of a rather nice Latin translation of the song. She expressed some disappointment that the song had not been translated into Oscan, as the more ancient language of Pompeii,…

So where is Narnia?

I’m still working away at my maps of the languages of ancient Italy. Going through all the examples of Greek inscriptions from Italy in the SEG, I found one from Narnia. I’d come across the ancient city of Narnia (modern-day Narni) when I was writing my book, and then kind of forgotten about it until this…

From Oscan hirpus to English hearse

Myriapod Productions have released a rather lovely video in their “Mysteries of Vernacular” series tracing the etymology of the English word hearse back to the Oscan word hirpus, ‘wolf’. (This was discovered and sent to me by my friend Julia, so many thanks to her! I have included some pictures of coins below, because she likes coins.) This…

The Women’s Classical Committee UK

Over the past few months, I’ve been involved with the formation of the Women’s Classical Committee UK. There’s been an organisation for women in Classics in the US for a long time (the Women’s Classical Caucus), and there’s also an equivalent organisation in Australia and New Zealand. So when Liz Gloyn (among others) suggested a…