Reblogged: Learning the alphabet

This morning the blogosphere has obligingly brought me the answer to a question I couldn’t answer yesterday. Natalia Elvira Astoreca, of the CREWS project in Cambridge, has written a blog post on the different ways that people learn the alphabet in modern Europe. A colleague asked me a question about this at my talk yesterday, which I…

Happy first birthday, blog! What I’ve learned so far

Amazingly, it is now a year since I started this blog in its current form. I had a website previously, which was mainly just for sharing teaching materials, but on 2nd June 2015 I revamped this site and wrote my first research-driven blog posts. This year has been busy in general, and has flown by…

It’s all Greek to Anna

It’s All Greek to Me is a brand new blog by my colleague Anna Judson. Anna is an expert on Linear B, linguistics and Greek in general, so I know that lots of readers will be interested in her site. Anna has long been a major contributor to the Res Gerendae graduate student Classics blog, but…

Reblogged: Why did Roman emperors get assassinated so often?

Because sometimes you ask the internet a question, and someone out there writes a whole post dedicated to answering it for you. This week, my excellent internet friend and fellow Early Career Researcher Emma Southon has posted a blog on why Roman emperors get assassinated so often compared to monarchs in other states. (Even if you definitely…

Plautus and plavtad

Here’s a nice post by Matteo Calabrese on the meaning behind the name of the Roman dramatist Plautus, with a reference back to the post I wrote on the Pietrabbondante tile in January. If you were wondering, his name is derived from a nickname meaning “flat-footed” – but as far as I know, we can…

Reblogged: Samnites in Pompeii

Originally posted on Pompeian Connections:
Yesterday came a rather exciting announcement that a Samnite grave has been discovered in Pompeii. The details revealed thus far include that a skeleton, belonging to a woman approximately forty to fifty years old, complete with grave goods including numerous jars still containing traces of their original contents, has been…