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Digital and practical epigraphy

It's been an extremely busy April on the 'Connectivity and Competition' project. After an intense two-week research trip (blog post forthcoming), there was the Workshop on Digital and Practical Epigraphy at the ICS in London, co-led by Dr Gabriel Bodard, which took place from 29th April - 4th May 2019. The concept of the workshop... Continue Reading →

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Reblogged: What to write with?

From the CREWS project blog, here's a great new blog post by Pippa Steele. It's the result of an experimental archaeology investigation into the types of styli used for different types of clay tablets around the ancient Mediterranean. I saw Pippa give a paper based on this research in Cambridge a few weeks ago, and... Continue Reading →

Etruscan/Latin bilingualism and class

This term, I'm working on the translations for my Italy Before Rome sourcebook. (Among other things, I've learned very swiftly that I am not capable of translating more than one language in the same day, so I have to block out each day for different things.) The result of reading these texts so closely is... Continue Reading →

Etruscan Lisa Simpson

You can never predict how the internet will react to something. On Friday, I tweeted a picture of a bronze Etruscan statuette which I described as 'Etruscan Lisa Simpson'. I'd actually tweeted this already, about six months previously, but came across it again as I was revising a chapter. This time, Lisa caught everyone's imagination,... Continue Reading →

Italy Before Rome: A Sourcebook

I'm very pleased to say that Italy Before Rome: A Sourcebook is now under contract with Routledge, as part of the Routledge Sourcebooks for the Ancient World series. The book is based on my module 'Italy Before Rome', which ran in 2017/18 - but with plenty more material and, crucially, new translations of the material we covered.... Continue Reading →

Rhaetic on screen

I was amazed to hear recently that there is a film out where the dialogue is in Rhaetic. This is one of the more obscure languages of ancient Italy, and not one which usually gets a lot of attention. [NB - some links and videos in this post include images of human remains.] Iceman (2017) is a... Continue Reading →

Heatwave archaeology

The UK (and many other areas of the world) has been experiencing a prolonged heatwave this summer. Some love it, and some hate it, but it's clearly been fantastic for archaeologists. In the dry weather, grass and crops dry out at different rates depending on what the soil underneath is like - where there was... Continue Reading →

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