Reblogged: Myths about writing, plus Phaistos discuits

This week on the CREWS project blog (which has a lovely redesigned website!), PhD student Natalia has written about the various different Greek and Roman myths relating to the creation of the alphabet. The most famous mythical progenitor of the alphabet is perhaps Cadmus, who is often credited with inventing or popularising the Greek alphabet.…

Reblogged: The Partial Historians

The Partial Historians podcast uses Roman historical sources to discuss the founding of Rome and the city’s early history. This week, they use accounts by Dionysius of Halicarnassus and Livy to talk about the Roman relationship with their Oscan-speaking neighbours in the fifth century BC. I love the style of this podcast – their close…

Reblogged: Learning the alphabet

This morning the blogosphere has obligingly brought me the answer to a question I couldn’t answer yesterday. Natalia Elvira Astoreca, of the CREWS project in Cambridge, has written a blog post on the different ways that people learn the alphabet in modern Europe. A colleague asked me a question about this at my talk yesterday, which I…

Barefaced Greek

This week I was excited to see the release of the first film by new company Barefaced Greek – and even more excited to see that the film was the opening speech of Aeschylus’ Agamemnon. In their own words, Barefaced Greek is “a new initiative to create digital educational resources for the study of Classics and…

How I plan

I didn’t mean to make this a week of “How-To” blog posts, but somehow it has become one! Soon after I published my post “How I Write a Lecture“, Ellie Mackin posted my contribution to her “How I Plan” series of interviews. If you want to know how I plan my research, you can read…

Reitia on the CREWS blog

I’m really pleased that Venetic and the goddess Reitia have been included on the CREWS project blog. Many thanks to Pippa Steele for writing this post, making such good use of my photos (and Anna’s delicious cake). As Pippa points out, Venetic gives us lots of important and unparalleled evidence for how people learned to…

Happy first birthday, blog! What I’ve learned so far

Amazingly, it is now a year since I started this blog in its current form. I had a website previously, which was mainly just for sharing teaching materials, but on 2nd June 2015 I revamped this site and wrote my first research-driven blog posts. This year has been busy in general, and has flown by…