Digital Italy Part 2

On Tuesday, we held the second half of the Digital Italy seminar. Like last time, I wanted to post a links round-up so that people can find these great projects and resources and see how they develop over the coming years. Luca Rigobianco (Venice) - Building a digital corpus and a computational lexicon of the... Continue Reading →

Digital Italy Part 1

It was a real treat to host the first part of our Digital Italy seminar from my new office in Durham. We had participants and speakers from all over the world today, and we heard about a range of new and existing digital projects linked to ancient Italy. This post serves as a link round-up,... Continue Reading →

The mystery of Etruscan 4 and 6

This week is all about numbers (specifically the number 270). As we all sit here waiting for the counting to happen, I thought I'd share one of the most intriguing little pieces of detective work in Etruscan studies: the number system. As we've discussed before, it's not difficult to read Etruscan - we know what... Continue Reading →

New books on pre-Roman Italy you should read

Over the last few years, the field has been hugely enriched by lots of innovative new books on pre-Roman Italy and its populations. Many of them have really committed to interdisciplinary methods, combining historical, archaeological and linguistic evidence - with great results. Even better, these books are perfect to set for undergraduate reading (if you... Continue Reading →

Heatwave archaeology

The UK (and many other areas of the world) has been experiencing a prolonged heatwave this summer. Some love it, and some hate it, but it's clearly been fantastic for archaeologists. In the dry weather, grass and crops dry out at different rates depending on what the soil underneath is like - where there was... Continue Reading →

How I draw inscriptions

First of all - happy second birthday, blog! The blog is now regularly getting 2000 readers a month which - let's be honest - is a lot more people than have read my book in the same period, and that's why I love blogging. It's been great to publish my work in different ways and... Continue Reading →

Talk: HiSoN 2017, New York

I'm very excited to be speaking this week at the Historical Sociolinguistics Network Conference (HiSoN) 2017 in New York, hosted by NYU and CUNY Graduate Centre. I hugely enjoyed HiSoN 2015, and met some lovely people doing fascinating work there, so I'm looking forward to this year's conference hugely. I'm speaking on the first day of... Continue Reading →

New Module: Roman Death

This term, I've been doing something pretty new for me - planning an 11-week course on Roman Death for 70 first and second year students, complete with 22 hours of lectures and 5 seminars. It's a big task, both for me and for the students, so it's lucky that our subject is completely inexhaustible. We've... Continue Reading →

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