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Mapping Language Contact – Phase 1

It’s become a bit of a cliche for me that my academic talks tend to start with a map of the languages of Italy, followed by an explanation of why the map is dangerously misleading. The map that I normally use is from Wikipedia, and looks like this: Now, this map does the job in…

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Four footprints, two languages, one tile

hn. sattiieis. detfri segnatted. plavtad herennis. amica signauit. qando. a- ponebamus. tegila(m)   Detfri of Hn. Sattis signed with a footprint. Amica of Herens signed when we were laying out the tile. Oscan/Latin inscription and four shoe prints on a large clay roof tile (0.67 x 0.94m). Pietrabbondante, c. 100 BC. Imagines Italicae: Teruentum 25;…

Greek in Italy at the Festival of Ideas and the Fitzwilliam Museum

The Cambridge Festival of Ideas rolls around again this week, with lots of great events to get involved with, including a lot of events in the Classics Faculty. As always, the Greek in Italy project has made a couple of contributions. Geoff’s talk “Did Language Matter? Local Versus Imperial Languages in Classical Antiquity” has already sold…

Book! 2015

“Oscan in Southern Italy and Sicily” is out this week

I’m very excited to announce the publication of my book Oscan in Southern Italy and Sicily. The editor very kindly dropped the first copy round to my house last night, and I’m really pleased with how it has turned out. This book started life as my PhD thesis (pictures of its journey from thesis to book…

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Why Historians and Linguists Should Read the Ibis Trilogy

Historians and linguists of the world: you should be reading Amitav Ghosh’s Ibis Trilogy – Sea of Poppies, River of Smoke, and the recently released Flood of Fire. (For those who have already started Flood of Fire, don’t worry, there are no spoilers ahead.) I’m hoping the historians don’t need too much convincing. Ghosh’s trilogy…