Cambridge Greek Play 2016

As some of you know, I've been in the chorus of the Cambridge Greek Play a couple of times - in Agamemnon in 2010 and in Prometheus/Frogs 2013. I've also written before about putting together the Cambridge Greek Play online archive, which I did in the summer of 2015. This year, I had the unique experience of being... Continue Reading →

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Gendered speech in Aristophanes

I'm excited to say that my article "The sociolinguistics of gender, social status and masculinity in Aristophanes" has now been published online in the Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics.  The research in this article ultimately goes all the way back to my undergraduate thesis, though my conclusions have changed many times since then. But I kept coming... Continue Reading →

Cambridge Greek Play Website Launch

I'm very excited to announce the launch of the new Cambridge Greek Play website! The new website is not just the place for finding out about the new productions of Antigone and Lysistrata in 2016 (which you can also find out about via @camgreekplay). It's also meant as an archive of past productions - you... Continue Reading →

Archiving the Cambridge Greek Play

The Cambridge Greek Play desperately needs a new website. Very soon, I'm pleased to say this website will become a reality, and I will certainly be plugging it and providing links when it launches. Fortunately, we are paying some highly talented and professional designers to construct the website itself, thanks to a donation reserved for... Continue Reading →

Why Do Greek Plays have Latin Titles?

One of the most famous Greek tragedies is called Oedipus Rex. Well, sort of. Its original Greek title is Oidípous Týrannos, but usually everyone calls it by its Latin name. Even the English title Oedipus the King is heard much more rarely. And it's not just this play that's the problem. Ancient Greek plays are... Continue Reading →

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