Theorizing contacts in the Roman Empire

Last weekend, I was fortunate enough to travel to Edinburgh to take part in the conference 'Theorizing contacts in the Roman Empire'. As you can see from the description of the conference, it was exactly the kind of thing I love talking about! We live in a multicultural world, in which every community develops in... Continue Reading →

Advertisements

How I plan

I didn't mean to make this a week of "How-To" blog posts, but somehow it has become one! Soon after I published my post "How I Write a Lecture", Ellie Mackin posted my contribution to her "How I Plan" series of interviews. If you want to know how I plan my research, you can read... Continue Reading →

New Digital Research Tools 2

Over a year ago, I posted about some new digital research tools I'd been trying out, and which of them had worked/not worked for me. I've been meaning to write an update to this for a while because, actually, I've changed my mind quite a bit since then. So here's New Digital Research Tools 2... Continue Reading →

Moving Romans

Around the time of the EU referendum, I wrote a review of Moving Romans: Migration to Rome in the Principate by Laurens E. Tacoma. Ancient migration has been very prominent in my work recently: the Greek in Italy project just hosted a conference on ancient migration and mobility in May this year, and  this book helped... Continue Reading →

Exchange in the Mediterranean

The new book Échanger en Méditerranée: Acteurs, pratiques et normes dans les mondes anciens turned up in my pigeon hole this week - and I'm thrilled to see it in physical form at last! I was also sent some beautifully produced physical off-prints of my chapter - I haven't seen one of them in ages, and they look... Continue Reading →

It’s all Greek to Anna

It's All Greek to Me is a brand new blog by my colleague Anna Judson. Anna is an expert on Linear B, linguistics and Greek in general, so I know that lots of readers will be interested in her site. Anna has long been a major contributor to the Res Gerendae graduate student Classics blog, but... Continue Reading →

The CREWS project

Everyone interested in ancient languages and scripts should follow the CREWS project blog. CREWS (which stands for Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems) is a major new ERC-funded project hosted at the Faculty of Classics, Cambridge, run by my excellent colleague Pippa Steele. To quote from her introduction to the project: The aim of... Continue Reading →

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑