Citation trouble

One of the toughest thing about starting out in Classics, whether you’ve just arrived at university, you’re starting to research your undergrad dissertation, or you’re in the first term of your PhD, is all the abbreviations. Bibliographies can just look like an impenetrable secret code before you get used to how authors, ancient texts and modern journals are abbreviated. And it’s pretty impossible to google “CA” to figure out what journal that is.

I wrote once before about the, essentially, weird and illogical traditional abbreviations for Greek and Latin dramas, but I wasn’t too helpful on where to go if you’re stuck. Here is a great post from the Library of Antiquity blog about how to tackle abbreviations you haven’t seen before, looking particularly at journal abbreviations. It’s a fantastic guide to anyone who is struggling with their reading list at the beginning of term.

Hope you’re all enjoying the start of term!

abbreviations-secondary-roller-bib

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Citation trouble

Add yours

  1. I hate the abbreviation CA (which to me is the Classical Association) and much prefer ClAnt — but I believe CA thinks its abbreviation is CA.
    Thanks for passing along our post!

    Like

  2. That is the most ridiculous example out there. No matter what, I think full names are definitely the way to go! But maybe people feel that they spent so much time learning the abbreviations, they’d like to get some use out of them…

    Like

  3. At least abbreviations like CA are work-outable in principle. How is one ever to know that KZ, for example, stands for Historische Sprachforschung? (founded in the 19th century by Adalbert Kuhn, and hence ‘Kuhn’s Zeitschrift). This is the reason why I always give the full titles of journals!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: